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Say my name, say my name

Wild Alaska pollock. Wild Alaska pollock. Wild Alaska pollock. Wild Alaska pollock.

Wild Alaska pollock. Wild Alaska pollock. Wild Alaska pollock. Wild Alaska pollock. Wild Alaska pollock. Wild Alaska pollock. Wild Alaska pollock.

Advertising professionals use the term “effective frequency” to denote the number of times a consumer must be exposed to an advertising message before he or she becomes familiar with and trusts the product associated with the message.

Got milk?; Just do it; Tastes great, less filling; Where’s the beef?; Breakfast of Champions; 15 minutes could save 15% or more on car insurance.

These are just a few advertising phrases that have been repeated thousands of times over many years as sirens identifying the products with which they are associated.

The seafood world has few of its own: Charlie the tuna; Chicken of the sea, Bumble Bee, but can wild Alaska pollock become a recognized marketing moniker and more than just seafood trade speak?

Maybe. Check out the new ad from US fast-food chain Arby's and see how it has effortlessly woven in the the phrase for its new Lenten promotion. Below that is a new ad from fast-food chain Jack in the Box, touting its pollock sandwich.

Largely with the full force of Trident Seafoods behind it -- and now the newly revamped Genuine Alaska Pollock Producers (GAPP) -- the phrase wild Alaska pollock appears to be seeping ever so slowly into the food world's lexicon.

The goal, of course, is to differentiate Alaska pollock from pollock supplied by the world's other major producer -- Russia. Just how much buyers ultimately value Alaska over Russia as the source of their pollock relies on a myriad of factors, from price to availability to product form and more. If Alaska was able to really connect the phrase wild Alaska pollock with consumers would this tip the balance in the favor of Alaska's fish? Time might tell.

Want to market Alaska pollock but don't have the money? This group wants to help

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But let's not get ahead of ourselves, of course. It takes lots of money and lots of patience and time for an ad phrase to mature into something familiar to consumers. And in this case it takes buy-in from big restaurant chains with large marketing budgets to push the message to the masses, as demonstrated in the promotional videos above.

But if you repeat something often enough, so the theory goes, it becomes the truth. We'll see.

Wild Alaska pollock. Wild Alaska pollock. Wild Alaska pollock. Wild Alaska pollock. Wild Alaska pollock. Wild Alaska pollock. Wild Alaska pollock.

Any comments, complaints, retaliatory rants? Please feel free to email me at john.fiorillo@intrafish.com.

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